Why It Sucks And It’s Awesome At The Same Time To Be A Performing Artist

I’ve been a performing artist for a few years now, be it solo with my guitar, with Solitaire Revival or doing spoken word poetry sometimes. Being on stage has its fair share of perks as well as challenges, just like anything else.  The experience of performing your own creations on stage, be it poetry, music, theatre, etc. is truly exhilarating and rewarding, no matter how much money one makes doing. I would know, being a musician that doesn’t have a lot of money to throw around. Since I always like to deliver the bad news first and the good last, I’ll start with why it sucks to be a performing artist:

WHY IT SUCKS:

1. Haters.

When I first started playing guitar I felt a little behind the curve, considering I was 18 going on 19 with absolutely zero musical experience or background, save for classes in school that never put an instrument into my hands. I never joined the school band, was not confident in my singing voice and didn’t know the first thing about guitars.

For the most part people were supportive. I learned from a friend how to play the basics and eventually took lessons, which amplified my progress a great deal. It wasn’t very fun though when I would encounter a few negative remarks here and there in regards to my new venture into becoming a musician.  Some people I would talk to about it would tell me that I had started too late and wouldn’t get anywhere. Starting a journey into an art form is a lot like wearing a new piece of clothing: many people admire the new look, but the few that notice that tiny little imperfection on the right sleeve are the few whose comments you can’t seem to forget.

I got a bit more flack when I started singing. I knew my voice was lackluster but I just did it anyway. I figured I wasn’t getting any younger and I have my whole life to improve, why not try and sing? Once again many of the people around me told me I sounded nice and to keep working at it, but the few people who told me I sounded horrible or shouldn’t try were the comments that stuck. I had one friend tell me that if I didn’t sound good already there was no point in trying.

I still getting the occasional negative comment on my Youtube channel or what have you, but I’ve learned to shake off the negativity and if anything to use it to improve my skills.

2. Finding places to perform.

In a place like New York City, there is no shortage of places to play by any means, but a lot of places want experienced artists. If I learned one thing from job searching this year it’s that you need to have experience to get more, and to initially get anywhere you need to be humble and start smaller than you may originally want to.  I began going to open mics and performing my original songs, starting with a very supportive crowd where I had my guitar lessons, The New York City Guitar School. There’s actually a video on Youtube of my very first performance there! My voice was very shaky and out of key, and I was extremely nervous but afterwards I felt the stagefright lift from my shoulders. I was lucky to have the resource of a supportive atmosphere for an open mic, because many musicians just starting out don’t know where to begin.

3. Hobby? Or Job?

Where I currently am on the spectrum of my musical career is trying to turn my favorite hobby, performing with my band, into a paid gig. It’s way harder than it seems to keep up with bandmates, draw enough people to get paid for live shows, pay for studio time, etc. Everyone in the band has their own personal, work, and/or edcucational endeavors to deal with in addition to the band, which is the case for most young musicians in any sort of musical group.  As a hobby it’s already an amazing experience, but the dream has always been to get paid to play one’s own music.  It takes a lot of hard work and diligence as well as creativity and good chemistry with the people around you to do this. It’s very hard to break through into paid gigs, but I’m sure if I acheive a level of skill where I can live solely off musical earnings the rewards will be vast.

 

WHY IT’S AWESOME:

1. Creativity coming to fruition

There’s nothing better than putting a brainchild of yours into the universe and having it received well by your peers, especially strangers who have never seen you before and will offer a truly unbiased opinion of your work.  I wrote most of the lyrics for my band’s songs as well as over 50 solo songs, and there’s nothing better than getting positive feedback from a song I wrote myself or had a part in creating somehow. Whether its someone rocking out to our music when we’re on stage or if it’s someone commenting on Youtube or Facebook that they like a video of mine, I feel the utmost appreciation for whoever sent that love my way, and love my own creations all the more at the same time.

2. Performing artists make great friends

It’s true. Many startup artists become friendly right away when in the same room, because no matter what venue of the arts one is in, the struggle is shared of looking for work, picking one’s own brain to write/compose more works of art, and most of all the all-too familiar feeling of being on stage where as proud and vibrant one may look, they are actually at their most vulnerable point. It’s one thing to be on one’s own at home, ‘woodshedding’, or practicing and rehearsing to yourself, but to share your art with others who do the same is one of the best pleasures I know. It’s so great to find someone new to jam with, to write poetry with, or to be in a band and to play a song together.  Also, I have found through my journeys as a musician that performing artists of any kind are usually the most chilled out people alive and are great to have around, whether you yourself are an artist or not.

3. Immortalization

Now I don’t mean that I’m invincible. What I mean is that hopefully after I’ve left this earth, my great grandkids will ask what I was like as a person, and someone down the line will have saved recordings of my music.  To publish art, be it paintings, illustration, jewelry, music, theatre, literature, means that it is out there in the universe and you never know where and for how long it will float around, but if you’re an artist of any sort you may like to think that your creative endeavors may have resonated somewhere with someone in the world and hopefully helped them somehow in their own life.

4. “Hey, I’m in the band,” is an excellent pickup line after a show. – RSM

Weird Dream Log 1

SO i had this very ridiculously weird dream.

I dreamt that I was in some town where I had a few friends and drug dealers would hang out with tables on the street selling some kind of drug that you smoked that wasn’t weed, and it was legal there. I remember being high on it the whole time I was dreaming. I remember seeing a lot of really odd happenings.

For instance, there would be cars that would pull up to places completely encased in a thin layer of white, wavy ice with layers. I remember parting ways and then rejoining groups of friends in different houses. the entire town was built on some plateau-like land. I remember going to the play ground in the town and it was completely normal that I was playing in the same place as little kids high off my mind.

Alot of people were my age and wore neon colored clothing. The weirdest part was that people would consciously engage in really odd behavior and it was just part of the town’s society and culture. So it was normal toward the end of the dream when I was sitting in a cafe with clear windows as walls to a neighboring firehouse.The firetruck in it had the look of a prop of a movie set and at one point I saw three guys put on yellow bicycle helmets and red and yellow children’s size backpacks and then 2 of them rode bikes into the night while the other jogged behind them. I asked someone who I was friends with in the dream what they were up to and i got a reply that went something like “Dude, yeah. That’s the fake firehouse. duh!”

Weirdest experience ever in a dream. – RSM

A Few Goals

I tend to be very ambitious when setting goals for myself. Especially in recent years I’ve adopted a ‘shoot for the moon’ mentality when writing down my dreams. In the word of an Emmett Smith biography I read in grade school, “Goals are just dreams until you write them down.”

Here are a few goals I would like to accomplish within a the next few years in my life:

– Complete a master’s degree in Spanish

-Complete a Ph.D in Linguistics

-Be fluent in 6 different languages in 6 years.

-Publish a novel within the next 3 years.

This is the first step in becoming a linguist. I want to master my native tongue at the level of an academic in order to better communicate with other Latinos, have better marketability in the job market and for personal peace of mind.  I’ve always wanted to be fluent in Spanish and have made leaps and bounds in learning the language as an undergrad.  I would like to eventually travel to Latin America when my Spanish skills are developed enough to get around by myself.  This will open the door to my next two goals. I would like to enroll in a New York City based college or university by the Fall of 2014 for an M.A. in Spanish.

-Complete a Ph. D in Linguistics.

I’ve always dreamed of speaking mulitple languages, and using this knowledge to travel the world.  I figured there’s no better way to study language than the field of linguistics.  I see it like this: I’m a musician and in order to learn how to play any instrument, one must have a working knowledge of music theory. Linguistics is the music theory of language.  This goal may take a while to complete but rest assured it will happen eventually.

-Be fluent in 6 languages in 6 years.

Although it may sound very challenging on paper, this goal will work hand in hand with the first two.  I’ve picked up different languages while studying abroad very fast and have learned that full blown immersion is the best way to learn a language.  I want to be able to speak, write, read and understand Spanish, French, Japanese, Cantonese, and Arabic apart from already knowing English.  With any of those three languages mastered, I could land a job translating, pehaps even for the U.N. That would be amazing. I figured I have 6 years and change to master 5 languages, 2 of which I have studied before and one (Spanish) I already know pretty well.  My goal is to be fluent in all of these by the time I’m 30.

-Publish a novel within the next 3 years.

My lifelong goal has been to become a published author. Techinically I have many published works already in the field of journalism, but I would like to take my authorship a step further into the realms of fiction and non-fiction.  I would love to write any and every kind of novel, and already have a few solid ideas and short stories to build on.  Although many may say print is dead, that is not the case at all for the written word itself.  The way I see it, like many industries the publishing industry is being changed by recent technological progress we have acheived as a society and will continue to grow albeit in a slightly different avenue from that of the traditional.  Whether it’s in print or if it’s on a Nook or Kindle, my goal is to become a bestselling author at some point in my life.

Hopefully one day I’ll look back at this post and reminisce about my journey toward accomplishing all of these.  I guess until then, I’ll have to take it step by step and hope, and work for the best outcome. Peace -RSM